Something Else Unknown: Richard Froude

“I want to think of this work as contoured. I want it to rise and fall.”*

Richard Froude, born in London, moved to the US in August 2002 at age 23. I was 24, having just moved back to New Orleans from five years out West. Because I knew no one in the city, I walked along the Mississippi after the sun had gone down—for the breeze that blew away the closeness of the Quarter, and for the lights of the ships. Maybe just for the movement. Continue reading

In Memory of Maria Schneider

1952–2011

Maria Schneider, the female lead in two of my all-time favorite films, Bernardo Bertolucci’s Last Tango in Paris (1972) and Michelangelo Antonioni’s The Passenger (1975), died yesterday from cancer. This depresses me quite a bit, actually—Schneider was a tremendous actor who never really got the credit she deserved for her remarkable performances in each of those classic films. Anyone who can hold her own against Marlon Brando and Jack Nicholson (and at such a young age, and in a second language, and in such difficult filming conditions) is obviously insanely talented. Roger Ebert, in his 2004 reconsideration of Last Tango, said it very well:

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Brevity, Part 2: Long Takes

Some of us have been discussing long takes in movies, and John mentioned that he’d like seeing a list of films that consist primarily of the beautiful things. So here is a start at such a list. (And here is another one, which like this list embeds many YouTube clips, such as the magnificent opening shot Orson Welles’s Touch of Evil (1958), the homage Robert Altman pays it in The Player (1992), and many others—including some overlap.)

But first: What’s the value in the long take?

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