Meat Is All, the next Nephew from MLP

from MLP:

The next Nephew title from Mud Luscious Press is officially up for grabs: Meat Is All by Andrew Borgstrom. This is Borgstrom’s debut book & his words were thunder in our eyes, cloud-lightning sentences. You can read an excerpt & order your copy here. This book will be available for 90 days or until 150 copies are sold, whichever comes first. Thanks again for supporting our books & their wonderful authors.

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Nephew’s inaugural title: Darby Larson’s The Iguana Complex!

Holy smokes!  Nephew, an exciting new imprint of Mud Luscious Press, has announced its first title: Darby Larson’s The Iguana Complex, “a wonder of negation & meta-narrative, a mountain of little steps walking in circles.” Nephew publishes raw & aggressive pocket-sized titles in limited-editions of 150 copies or for a sales period of three months, whichever comes first. There will be no subsequent editions (Translation: get in on this bad-ass action now!  Only $10.  And what a stunning cover). 

Larson has had short fiction published recently at The Collagist, Everyday Genius, Caketrain, & New York Tyrant. He is also the editor of Abjective.

Here’s a little somthing to whet the appetite:

They are to each other after and on the flower near the crackling fire next to each other but when she looks she’s no longer looks at him. Looks at him. She’s not there looks at him. No longer on, she’s not there, the lone floor of Freeman’s living room and/or the opera stage where the deafening noise, rather, from our crowd’s spoke-woken her. She must have passed, missed, slipped out, slipped, must have hurled herself in the path of a hurled pointy hat. The crowd’s on their endingly feet singing neverendingly songs over and over, the song Cassandra beguttoned a day or so ago.

Oh Reuben, oh Reuben, offstage jumping: keep it going, yes yes, keep singing, keep it going. But she’s jumped and banged and heaven’s sake and sang enough for heaven’s sake, was just pointed-hat-hurled on stage for heaven’s sake, hurled in the pointed hurled hat with a head.

The crowd sobers when the loss of their leader is lost from the strange of the onstage. They file, the crowd, out of our theater seats whistling like a bird-caller army in their cars, near their dinners, at their desserts, within dreams, out from deserts, under oceans, sleepwalking-whistling to kitchens preparing two egg in the morning salad sandwiches.

Freeman prepares himself and his components, the components of the egg salad sandwich at two in the morning with his kitchen around him, tea kettle whistling. Whistling.

No longer whistling. Can you barely? You’ll need to look closer: Cassandra fashioning at Freeman’s kitchen table, the square one, eyes open, a mug of tea, ghost roses parading and the donkey playing a cello.

Love Is a Road and a River: A Review of Sasha Fletcher’s When All Our Days Are Numbered Marching Bands Will Fill the Streets & We Will Not Hear Them Because We Will Be Upstairs in the Clouds

With When All Our Days Are Numbered Marching Bands Will Fill the Streets & We Will Not Hear Them Because We Will Be Upstairs in the Clouds (Mud Luscious Press, 2010) Sasha Fletcher has distinguished himself as a writer of great imagination, a careful craftsman of sentences, one attentive to tone and rhythm, to the visual dynamics of the page, to a profluence not beholden to the unbreakable chain of this-follows-that, a profluence sensitive to the reader’s inherent capacity to fill in the mortar between the bricks of text. The novella’s unnamed narrator, a bemused creator who, traveling to and from a kind of dreamland, performs many magical acts like walking into telephone lines and out of phones, like “building” a garden, steamboat, window, river, meadow, fridge, table, stove, sink, and even a well on the roof. At one point, he even tries “so hard to make lightning come spilling out of the clouds.” And that “so” is one signal of the narrator’s earnestness. If there is any single theme to Fletcher’s novella it is acceptance, not a bored resignation but a surrendering to life’s absurdity, its whimsy, even its flimsiness. The narrator, after disbelieving that his “stories are getting sadder & sadder every day”, asserts: “There are lots of things on this earth not worth questioning.” And toward the end of the novella says, “There are some things we know & there are some things we don’t & for everything else just close your eyes and go to sleep. Tomorrow is another day.”

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Big Other Contributors’ News #7

J.A. Tyler‘s book THE ZOO, A GOING has officially been contracted for publication with Dzanc Books, 2013.
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Molly Gaudry has received four Pushcart Prize nominations this year! For “Beneath mosquito netting I imagine,” from PANK #3; “Parts,” from Whiskey Island Magazine; “Potpourri,” from Emprise Review; and “Excerpts from We Take Me Apart,” from Mud Luscious Press.
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John Dermot Woods‘s story called “Waterslide” is in the new issue of Anemone Sidecar (#5). Big Other contributors Greg Gerke, Ryan W. Bradley, and J.A. Tyler have stories in there too.
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Shya Scanlon will be reading with Leslieann Hobayan and Douglas Treem  on Wednesday, Dec. 9th at  Cornelia St. Cafe, 29 Cornelia Street in New York City. Details HERE.

Also, Shya’s Forecast 42 Project came to a close on Monday at Monkeybicycle.  He’s going to be guest posting about it on Monkeybicycles’s blog on Wednesday, Dec. 9th, too.
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Stacy Muszynski is conducting a series of interviews with writers, asking their thoughts on online publishing. Rick Moody, Matt Stewart, Matt Bell, Dagoberto Gilb, and others join the discussion. It’s all happening at American Short Fiction’s blog.

Stacy’s interview with Laura van den Berg, of What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us, will be at ASF blog next week, followed by three days of her guest blogging. Her review of Michael Zadoorian’s The Lost Tiki Palaces of Detroit will appear in the next issue of The Collagist.
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Sean Lovelace has a new flash in Hayden’s Ferry Review. He has another flash in PANK.
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John Madera‘s review of Justin Sirois’s MLKNG SCKLS appears in New Pages’ December issue.