Stories “Finished” by Lily Hoang

Unfinished is now available from Jaded Ibis Press. Lily Hoang–author of three novels, including the PEN award-winning Changing–invited her favorite writers to send her their scraps. She finished their unfinishables, even offering them to edit and revise what she produced. Some did, some didn’t. This collaborative enterprise is endlessly fascinating because one doesn’t know where the original author left off and where Lily took over, or if the authors edited what Lily made. The exquisite color edition contains art by Anne Austin Pearce. It’s the most unique, most colorful anthology of stories around.

Authors of unfinished writing are Kate Bernheimer, Blake Butler, Beth Couture, Debra Di Blasi, Justin Dobbs, Trevor Dodge, Zach Dodson, Brian Evenson, Scott Garson, Carol Guess, Elizabeth Hildreth, John Madera, Ryan Manning, Michael Martone, Kelcey Parker, Ted Pelton, Kathleen Rooney, Davis Schneiderman, Michael Stewart, J.A. Tyler.

Here’s a book trailer:

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Best of 2010, Part 1

Though this season has seen me being pummeled by the various viruses and whatnot that are floating around—not to mention succumbing, for perhaps the first time in my life, to some form of seasonal affective mood disorder—the year, as a whole, has had some bright moments (as Rahsaan Roland Kirk would say). At some point, I’ll post a list of what I enjoyed reading this year. In the meantime, I’ve asked many great writers to send along a list of some of their favorite books, music, films, events, moments, or whatever for 2010. As you’ll find below, these “bests” need not have been released this year. In this installment, check out lists by Scott Garson, Jamie Iredell, Norman Lock, Kevin Sampsell, and Ken Sparling. More to come, soon.

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A Sentence About a Sentence I Love: An Anthology, of Sorts

A few months ago, in April, to be exact, I started a series of posts entitled “A Sentence About a Sentence I Love” with a sentence about one of Gerard Manley Hopkins’s magnificent sentences. This concentration, or, rather, this obsession with the sentence may have come from my, at the time, recent readings of William Gass’s essays wherein he concentrates much of his attention on the sentence as a primary building block in poetry and prose. Essays by Gass like “The Soul Inside the Sentence,” “The Sentence Seeks Its Form,” “The Architecture of the Sentence,” take as their focus the centrality of the sentence toward the construction of thought, and particularly of thoughts within the parameters of fiction. In “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” Gass claims that sentences are “the most elementary instances of what the author has constructed….a moving unity of fact and feeling.” Moreover, sentences

must be sounded, too; it has a rhythm, speed, a tone, a flow, a pattern, shape, length, pitch, conceptual direction. The sentence confers reality upon certain relations, but it also controls our estimation, apprehension, and response to them. Every sentence, in short, takes metaphysical dictation, and it is the sum of these dictations, involving the whole range of the work in which the sentences appear, which accounts for its philosophical quality, and the form of life in the thing that has been made (Fiction and the Figures of Life, 14).

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Buffalo ArtVoice Flash Fiction Archive

There’s been some new pieces lately so I wanted to refresh this.

Mark Doten    “The Spider and Salt Hearts: A Fragment”

Sean Lovelace  “My Identity was Stolen”

Amber Sparks  “May We Shed These Human Bodies”

Rusty Barnes    “Something Like Love”

Thomas Cooper  “The Primary Reason”

In order of appearance:

Ravi Mangla  “Souvenirs”

JA Tyler “Inconceivable Wilson”

John Madera “Was What it Was”

Scott Garson “Buffalo Gymnopédie”

Nicolle Elizabeth “Bean Counting” and “I Do All My Own Stunts”

Peter Zinn “You’ve Got to Feel Bad for Hardware Stores”

Neely Terrell “E”

Ken Sparling “The Worst Day of My Life”

Kim Chinquee “Soldier”

Matt Bell “Hali, Halle, Hamako”

Eric Beeny “Laundry Day”

Lydia Copeland  “She Turns Out the Lights”

Corium Magazine is live!

Corium Magazine, a quarterly internet journal is now live. Lauren Becker, Heather Fowler and myself are happy to share the amazing work we’ve received. Go check it out.

Short Fiction:  Stephen Elliott, Sean Lovelace, Alec Niedenthal, Adam Moorad, Donna D. Vitucci
 
Very Short Fiction: Kathy Fish, Scott Garson, Beth Thomas, Kim Chinquee, Sheldon Compton, Ryan Ridge, Julie Babcock, Eric Beeny, Andrea Kneeland, Christina Murphy, Laura Ellen Scott
 
Poetry: Shaindel Beers, Corey Mesler, Sam Rasnake, Rusty Barnes and Cami Park.
 
Art: Ernest Williamson, Christopher Woods, James Roninger

Anatomy of a Flash: Scott Garson

Scott Garson writes fiction, he created Wigleaf and just last week Willows Wept Press announced his book, American Gymnopedies – a flash tour of cities in thirty states of union. His work is sterling, inventive, provocative. Consider this flash fiction. It was first published in Giancarlo Ditrapano’s great New York Tyrant. Special thanks for allowing the reprint. After the piece, I asked Scott some questions.

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