Most Anticipated Small Press Books of 2016!

Few exceptions aside, the most compelling, challenging, absorbing literary art is being produced by small presses and their respective writers. I asked a number of writers, editors, and publishers to send me a list of small press books to look out for in 2016. Below you’ll find my own list, which is informed by Kate Angus, John Cayley, Lauren Cerand, Samuel R. Delany, Rikki Ducornet, Andrew Ervin, Lily Hoang, Sean Lovelace, Scott McClanahan, Hubert O’Hearn, Jane Unrue, and Curtis White.

Below you’ll also find lists from Jeff Bursey, Tobias Carroll, Gabino Iglesias, Janice Lee, Dawn Raffel, Nick Francis Potter, John Reed, Adam Robinson, Michael Seidlinger, Terese Svoboda, Jason Teal, Angela Woodward, and Jacob Wren. All the abovementioned people are small press heroes and great writers in their own right. My thanks to all of them.

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An Interview with Paul Maliszewski

Alban Fischer (of TRNSFR Magazine) sent me a copy of Paul Maliszewski’s Prayer for What They Said and What They Were Not Told (a new chapbook from TRNSR‘s book imprint Varmint Armature), and asked me to contribute to a group interview. It is here.

Also participating were Scott Bradfield, Molly Gaudry, Caitlin Horrocks, Paul Kavanagh, Brian Mihok, Mike Topp, and J.A. Tyler

Announcing the Summer 2011 Issue of Requited

Carl Baratta, "Driver Take Me to the River 3."

The Summer 2011 issue of Requited is now online. It features:

  • fiction by Josh Collins, Jess Upshaw Glass, Suzanne Scanlon, Ben Slotzky, and Simon A. Smith;
  • poetry by Kristy Bowen, Nicelle Davis, Eric Ellingson, Molly Gaudry, Monica Gomery, Rich Ives, Alyse Knorr, Kate Martin Rowe, and J. A. Tyler;
  • essays by Steve Katz, Mark Rappaport, and Viktor Shklovsky;
  • visual art by Carl Baratta and Alexis MacKenzie;
  • and videos by Anne Elizabeth Moore and Hyon Jung Kim.

Please check it out! And since the nonfiction section is my domain, allow me to say a few words about the pieces there.

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Sweet! Actors Reading Writers

Where Three of Cups, 83 First Ave @ 5th St. (F/V to Second Ave)

When THIS THURSDAY, March 3rd, 7:30pm

These actors…

Mark Emerson

David Loewy

Ashley Marinaccio

Austin Mitchell

Emily Warshaw

Will be reading these writers…


PICASSO’S HEART and other poems by Molly Gaudry

FINDING AND FAULTING by Greg Gerke

GERMANY by John Haskell

MarkHARVEST by Mira Ptacin

KNIVES by Susan Tepper

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The Latest from Octopus

Congratulations to Jenny Zhang, Christopher DeWeese, and Rebecca Farivar for having their manuscripts selected for publication by Octopus Books 2011.

Congratulations also to finalists: Claire Donato, Julie Doxsee, Laura Eve Engel, Sasha Fletcher, Dan Hoy, Brenda Iijima, George Kalamaras, Kirsten Kaschock, Seth Landman, Linnea Ogden, Alexandria Peary, Craig Rebele, Rob Schlegel, S. E. Smith, and Melinda Wilson.

And in other Octopus news. . . .

www.octopusmagazine.com

 

#14 is live and features the following sixteen long poems:

The Water’s Piety in Doubt and Question by J. Michael Martinez

It is Especially Dangerous To Be Conscious of Oneself by Jeff Alessandrelli

Dwell-E by Brandon Downing

The Massachusetts Book of the Dead by Katie Peterson

Coney Island Avenue by Andy Fitch

Length of Fetch by Jesse Lichtenstein

A Geography of Pleasure by Amy King

Descend, Descend by Samuel Amadon

Vertigo and Bone Room by Julie Doxsee

from Rosalia by Molly Gaudry

The Kingdom of Blizzards by Michael Rerick

The Erotic Life of Art: A Seance with William Carlos Williams by Eileen R. Tabios

Topic Sentences by Dot Devota

We Know in 2010, We Survive by Claire Becker

The Personal History of Wind by Jennifer Denrow

Dark Highway by Zvonko Karanović transl. by Ana Božičević.

And the following reviews:

Not Blessed by Harold Abramowitz, reviewed by Janice Lee

Under the Quick by Molly Bendall, reviewed by Suzette Bishop

Sum of Every Lost Ship by Allison Titus, reviewed by David Carillo

Mr. Worthington’s Beautiful Experiments on Splashes, reviewed by Sommer Browning

Happy Birthday, Big Other!

With sites (especially blogs, I’d imagine) coming and going, resembling fairweathered friends with their weighty promises and concomitant lack of follow-through, and with evanescence and disposability, perhaps, being two of the internet’s primary characteristics, an internet year must be to an in-real-life year as what a dog year is to a human year. But it’s not for these reasons I’m happy to say that Big Other is celebrating its first year today.

A year ago, thinking about how frustrating it was to find a place that invited dialogue (and by “dialogue” I mean the concept formalized best, for me, by Paulo Friere, that is, a nexus that allows, encourages, fosters communication characterized by respect and equality, where diversity of thought is encouraged, where understanding and learning are privileged over mere judgment, although conclusions and sound and informed discernment, that is, sound judgment, and maybe even wisdom, may, in fact, result); thinking about how many blogs encourage stereotypes, discord, stupidity, inanity, macho posturing, and self-reflexiveness, blogs that are havens of groupthink, blogs that are really just another kind of mirror, mirror, on the wall, blogs that are really just digitized lint in an electronic navel; thinking about how I wanted something different from all that noise, I launched Big Other with the idea of it being what I, in some kind act of faith, called “an online forum of iconoclasts and upstarts focusing its lens on books, music, comics, film, video and animation, paintings, sculpture, performance art, and miscellaneous nodes and sonic booms,” a place to “explore how we are made and unmade by images, language, and sound; examine computer-mediated worlds; and dance along with various tumults, genre- and other border-crossings, trespassings, transgressions, and whatever, nevermind.” And I have to say that I haven’t been disappointed. Big Other has become all those things for me, and so much more, and by “so much more,” I mean, it has truly become a conduit for meeting many incredible people in person, and so, I really can’t wait to see what comes next for us.

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