Guest Post, by Dawn Raffel: A Sentence About a Sentence I Love

“The woman, who is me–why pretend otherwise?–wants to love a man she cannot have.”

–The opening salvo of Diane Williams’s story “All American.”

This sentence has it all: complexity, risk, play, cadential perfection; it puts you on notice that nothing in Williams’s story will be business as usual.

Dawn Raffel‘s latest book is Further Adventures in the Restless Universe.

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3 thoughts on “Guest Post, by Dawn Raffel: A Sentence About a Sentence I Love

  1. Ah yes. I love this sentence. This whole story, in fact. I think any single sentence from it could be grabbed and singled out as a “sentence I love.”

  2. In my thesaurus, Diane Williams is synonymous with “acuity,” and I say this not only because the word “acuity” is derived from acus the Latin word for “needle,” but also because just by looking at the word itself you get a cut, all of which mirrors the very incisiveness of Williams’s prose as well as the almost x-ray strength of her vision.

  3. Pingback: Sentences About a Loved Sentence « BIG OTHER

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